Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth

At the beginning of the week I took an inspiration trip to the National Gallery in London, (see the post for that and the artworks I found inspiring here!) and I was fortunate enough to see a mini exhibition whilst there – Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth. This is the first time these two works have been exhibited in the UK and this free exhibit will be open until 29th January 2017.

I had never before heard of this artist and so it was a pleasant introduction to him through his work, before jumping into the artwork let’s take a look at the man himself.

Fray Juan Bautista Maíno

Maíno was born in 1581 in a Spanish town named Pastrana which is about 80km from Madrid, where it is thought he underwent his artistic training. Like all the great artists of the age he traveled to Italy in his younger years and seemingly learned a lot about his trade in the process; he is recorded as living in Rome between 1609-10 and although it is unknown when he arrived in the city, it is known he was there by at least 1604.

Maíno returned to Spain in 1611 and continued working and receiving commissions and then at around 1616 he moved to Madrid and became master of painting to Prince Philip; who later became King Philip IV.

Maíno had a long and very successful career but in spite of that there are few of his works that are known; his paintings express the knowledge that he had of the stylistic tendencies prevalent in early 17th century Rome. His work also shows that he was inspired and influenced by artits such as Caravaggio, Gentileschi, Carracci and Reni.

Maíno died in 1649 in the College of Santo Tomas of Madrid.

Maíno’s Adorations

Fray Juan Bautista Maino - Adoration of the Shepherds - classical art - religious - biblical - painting - national gallery
Fray Juan Bautista Maino – Adoration of the Shepherds
Fray Juan Bautista Maino - Adoration of the Kings - Maino's Adorations - baroque art classical biblical religious painting
Fray Juan Bautista Maino – Adoration of the Kings

These two paintings measure over three metres in height and were orignally part of a ‘retablo’ (altarpiece) for the high altar of the Dominican church of San Pedro Mártir in Toledo between 1612-14.

They both sh0w the deep impression that had been left on Maíno by Caravaggio’s works which he would have seen whilst in Rome; the chiaroscuro lighting and the naturalistic approach to painting are clearly evident.

Another note of importance on these two paintings is that as well as being the greatest works created by Maíno, ‘the two adorations are also among the earliest Spanish paintings to have been executed in a Caravaggesque style’. This is also evidence of the far reaching influence of Caravaggio across Europe in the early 17th century.

My personal favourite of the two paintings is the Adoration of the Shepherds; the muted pallete works so well for the scene and although the composition is probably stronger in the Kings, in the Shepherds it works well enough to keep me captivated and engaged. I also find that the Shepherds painting shows a strong sense of humility on behalf of both the artist and the subject.

Maíno included a self portrait in the Adoration of the Kings, he is posed as a pilgrim on the left of the scene pointing towards the infant Christ. There is also an array of expensive and luxurious drapery which showcases Maíno’s knowledge and skill in the area, a lot of which was possibly influenced my his father who had been a cloth merchant.

All in all, this exhibition was well worth seeing and I’m glad that I have been introduced and made aware of another incredible artist from the past; being one that had been inspired by Caravaggio who is one of my favourites makes it even better.

JGlover

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The National Gallery – Inspiration Visit

Yesterday I decided to take the day out and head into London city and visit the National Gallery for some inspiration and downtime. Other than the commute (which is an absolute nightmare between rail strikes, xmas shoppers and general city hustle and bustle) it was a very worthwhile trip and extremely inspiring.

The main reason I went was to go and see the ‘Beyond Caravaggio’ exhibition currently being held there which I’ll write up in a separate post later in the week.

I’ve visited numerous galleries and museums in London and some of them several times, including the National Gallery, but this was the first time I got up close and personal to every artwork that caught my eye; I was scrutinizing every brushstroke and mark in as great detail as possible with the naked eye.

Here is a selection of some of my favourites from yesterday’s visit –

Continue reading “The National Gallery – Inspiration Visit”

My Father’s Sword – TAE17 Charity Exhibition

About a week ago during a perusal of Twitter I came across a charity exhibition called the Twitter Art Exhibit, rather than churn out second hand facts I’ll just paste below what their website states – www.twitterartexhibit.org

#TwitterArtExhibit founder, David Sandum

“Through art we can change the world.”

Continue reading “My Father’s Sword – TAE17 Charity Exhibition”

Astelle, Keeper of the Tomes

Here we are at last for another installment of the Leaves of Hellebore series, I’m still building a plot and this particular character’s introduction is integral to the main story which will begin to unfold soon.

Fantasy Art - J Glover Art - Josh Glover Art - Illustration - Portrait - Drawing - Leaves of Hellebore - Visual Story

“Astelle clutches her favourite of all the many books of Loregarde; a large, heavy and ancient tome of which she can understand nothing written within; but the beautifully written script is something magical in itself and captivating in the fullest sense leaving no need to understand, just a strong sense of admiration and wonderment.”

Astelle is the curator and keeper of the Loregarde Paper House, it boasts the largest collection of scrolls, records, tomes and manuscripts in the world and is also a place of learning for the sages.

Situated in the palace district of the Empire’s capital city, it is heavily guarded and entry is permitted only with special permission and even then not everything is allowed to be read by those permitted entry into the building; there is also a small collection of texts from the Eldar days although there are no known persons who can understand or translate them.

If you haven’t already then be sure to subscribe to my blog via email to be notified when I publish future posts, the subscription box can be found further down the page.

Also follow me on Instagram @JGloverArt if you wish to see my work in progress.

Until next time, farewell!

JGlover

The Stumbling Block…

The past few days have been a challenge indeed, I’ve been working on a new drawing for my Leaves of Hellebore project and had everything going nicely up until the end when it came to the hair.

Cursed curly hair, the photo reference I had failed me in those final moments and left me in dire straits.

That’s been it for the past few evenings, hours spent drawing in the hair and then erasing it and repeating until today, I decided to spend a few hours studying hair and drawing from life to gain a better understanding, with the aim of inventing the hair for my drawing and making it look as real as possible.

 A couple of pages of sketches I did whilst studying hair.

All said and done, this evening I finished the drawing off and whilst I’m not entirely happy with the hair it looks better than all the previously erased versions I had drawn. Also on the bright side, I’ve learned a lot about how hair works and the fundamentals of drawing it with volume and texture which is the foundation of a lesson that I’ll be building upon for the rest of my life.

Anyway I’ll have the new piece published tomorrow evening accompanied by its part in the story for the Leaves of Hellebore.

Until then, farewell!

JGlover