Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth

At the beginning of the week I took an inspiration trip to the National Gallery in London, (see the post for that and the artworks I found inspiring here!) and I was fortunate enough to see a mini exhibition whilst there – Maíno’s Adorations: Heaven on Earth. This is the first time these two works have been exhibited in the UK and this free exhibit will be open until 29th January 2017.

I had never before heard of this artist and so it was a pleasant introduction to him through his work, before jumping into the artwork let’s take a look at the man himself.

Fray Juan Bautista Maíno

Maíno was born in 1581 in a Spanish town named Pastrana which is about 80km from Madrid, where it is thought he underwent his artistic training. Like all the great artists of the age he traveled to Italy in his younger years and seemingly learned a lot about his trade in the process; he is recorded as living in Rome between 1609-10 and although it is unknown when he arrived in the city, it is known he was there by at least 1604.

Maíno returned to Spain in 1611 and continued working and receiving commissions and then at around 1616 he moved to Madrid and became master of painting to Prince Philip; who later became King Philip IV.

Maíno had a long and very successful career but in spite of that there are few of his works that are known; his paintings express the knowledge that he had of the stylistic tendencies prevalent in early 17th century Rome. His work also shows that he was inspired and influenced by artits such as Caravaggio, Gentileschi, Carracci and Reni.

Maíno died in 1649 in the College of Santo Tomas of Madrid.

Maíno’s Adorations

Fray Juan Bautista Maino - Adoration of the Shepherds - classical art - religious - biblical - painting - national gallery
Fray Juan Bautista Maino – Adoration of the Shepherds
Fray Juan Bautista Maino - Adoration of the Kings - Maino's Adorations - baroque art classical biblical religious painting
Fray Juan Bautista Maino – Adoration of the Kings

These two paintings measure over three metres in height and were orignally part of a ‘retablo’ (altarpiece) for the high altar of the Dominican church of San Pedro Mártir in Toledo between 1612-14.

They both sh0w the deep impression that had been left on Maíno by Caravaggio’s works which he would have seen whilst in Rome; the chiaroscuro lighting and the naturalistic approach to painting are clearly evident.

Another note of importance on these two paintings is that as well as being the greatest works created by Maíno, ‘the two adorations are also among the earliest Spanish paintings to have been executed in a Caravaggesque style’. This is also evidence of the far reaching influence of Caravaggio across Europe in the early 17th century.

My personal favourite of the two paintings is the Adoration of the Shepherds; the muted pallete works so well for the scene and although the composition is probably stronger in the Kings, in the Shepherds it works well enough to keep me captivated and engaged. I also find that the Shepherds painting shows a strong sense of humility on behalf of both the artist and the subject.

Maíno included a self portrait in the Adoration of the Kings, he is posed as a pilgrim on the left of the scene pointing towards the infant Christ. There is also an array of expensive and luxurious drapery which showcases Maíno’s knowledge and skill in the area, a lot of which was possibly influenced my his father who had been a cloth merchant.

All in all, this exhibition was well worth seeing and I’m glad that I have been introduced and made aware of another incredible artist from the past; being one that had been inspired by Caravaggio who is one of my favourites makes it even better.

JGlover

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My Father’s Sword – TAE17 Charity Exhibition

About a week ago during a perusal of Twitter I came across a charity exhibition called the Twitter Art Exhibit, rather than churn out second hand facts I’ll just paste below what their website states – www.twitterartexhibit.org

#TwitterArtExhibit founder, David Sandum

“Through art we can change the world.”

Continue reading “My Father’s Sword – TAE17 Charity Exhibition”

InkTober 2016

The time of year is fast approaching when artists of all different genres, styles and backgrounds partake in one of the biggest global art events of the modern age:

InkTober!

The rules for InkTober are simple enough:

InkTober 2016 rules art artist illustration drawing sketching sketch ink

There is also a list of daily prompts on the founder of Inktober, Jake Parker’s Website 

This will be the first year that I have taken part in InkTober and I must admit, I’m quite excited about it.

I plan to spend at least an hour every day in this endeavour, 40 minutes on a daily sketch and 20 or more minutes working towards a bigger and more detailed piece for the final day. I will only post my results to my blog once per week, but I will post every day on my –

Twitter – @JGloverArtist

Instagram – @JGloverFineArt

I don’t intend to follow the daily prompts, I want the freedom to sketch whatever takes my fancy on the day; coffee shop sketches, urban sketches, master studies and so on.

The first post on my blog for this InkTober project will be on Monday 3rd October, so I hope to see you then, in the meantime, feel free to check out a couple of my older ink drawings –

Wudang Monk

Study of Hands after Michelangelo

Dragon

JGlover

Morning Coffee VII – The £20 Masterpiece

Good Morning!

After a few weeks without one, welcome to this week’s Morning Coffee; get your favourite blend of pick-me-up ready and join me on a short journey as we take a look at the new £20 note design, which in my opinion is a thing of beauty and a well needed change for the better.

I’ll also briefly pick apart the subject matter of the design, there are two stunning paintings to analyse as well as an inspirational quote to consider.

Before going into the details let’s take a look at the note design itself, proudly featuring my favourite landscape artist of them all, JMW Turner.

Art-Artist-JMW Turner-New-Twenty-Pound-Note-Design-History-Money-Landscape

Continue reading “Morning Coffee VII – The £20 Masterpiece”

Morning Coffee VI – Tolkien Reading Day

Good Morning and Welcome

This week’s Morning Coffee has fallen on a very important and special date for any fans of Tolkien and his legendarium of Middle-earth; the fact that today has caught up with me almost by surprise has caused me to rearrange my schedule in order to compensate for it.

Make sure you have got your coffee at the ready and let’s take a short stroll along the road that goes ever on.

Tolkien Reading Day has been upheld each year by the Tolkien Society, since 2003 when they initiated this event to encourage fans and readers to celebrate and promote the life and works of J.R.R. Tolkien, by reading their favourite passages and sharing them with others. 

The theme for this year’s Tolkien Reading Day is Life, Death and Immortality.

I’m also excited that this will be the first year for me to be able to partake as I have now marked the date clearly in my calendar and my mind, it’s shameful that I hadn’t already done this but such is. 

Wow, I’ve gotten this far without a mouthful of coffee, although it’s no surprise that passion can be a better drive than caffeine, it’s the fusion of the two that I find a necessity in everyday life though.

Also starting today is another event in celebration of March 25th and Tolkien’s work, instigated by a fellow blogger, James over at A Tolkienist’s Perspective (a blog filled to the brim with highly interesting content and writings) has decided to do a #MegaMiddleEarthMarathon. The post with the details of this marathon and the hashtag can be found by Clicking Here. I will also be partaking in this marathon viewing of the six movies, watching the extended editions and consuming my weekend with the greatest creations of cinematic history. 

March 25th

So, let’s talk about March 25th and why this day has importance in the history of Middle-earth.

March 25th in the year 3019 of the Third Age is the date that the One Ring was finally cast into Mount Doom and destroyed, prompting the downfall of the Dark Lord Sauron and the tower of Barad-dûr in the process. The final destruction of The Lord of the Rings and the beginning of a new era; one where the darkness finally recedes after so many years of its influence and domination.

Now I’m going to take this moment to shamelessly promote my own work –

Sam Carrying Frodo-Painting-Oil Painting-Art-Fine Art-LOTR-Lord of the Rings-Tolkien
“I can’t carry it for you, but I can carry you!” – Oil on Canvas – 20″ x 16″

This piece of work is the fruit of my labours from my Lord of the Rings Project and my first oil painting, it seemed appropriate to add this to this post, if you’re interested in seeing the work that led towards this painting you can find my project posts by clicking the link.

Tolkien Reading Day

So what are your plans for today’s event, will you be reading any of Tolkien’s books and if so what will you be reading from? Will you be following the theme of Life, Death and Immortality or just reading generally? Lastly, do you intend to partake in the #MegaMiddleEarthMarathon and how long do you think it will take you to watch all six of the movies?

I’m most likely going to post again a bit later with some Tolkien excerpts in line with the theme for this year’s reading, please feel free to comment and thank you for joining me for this week’s Coffee Morning. 

As always stay caffeinated and until next time, take care!

JGlover

Morning Coffee V – The Ides of March and Tiramisu

Good Morning

Welcome to this week’s Morning Coffee, if you’re here and reading this, congratulations as you managed to survive the Ides of March on Tuesday. Although that doesn’t mean to say that you came through it unscathed; so get the coffee brewed and let the aroma begin to work its magic on your senses.

Let’s start with the Ideas of March; now I’m not one that believes in things such as omens, superstitions or numerological harbingers, but the Ides of March does stand out in my mind and holds a certain sense of foreboding; with as much thanks to Shakespeare as Julius Caesar.

Continue reading “Morning Coffee V – The Ides of March and Tiramisu”